A title does not automatically make you a leader

What makes a leader? You make decisions that impact the lives of your family, your employees and your community every day. Whether you own a business or are an employee, it is important to remember that leadership doesn’t always comes with a formal title; sometimes you simply lead from where you stand. A leader isn’t measured by how much they make or how many people they manage, a leader is defined by the impact they have on those closest to them. Look at the people around you who depend on you for guidance. Who do you look to for leadership and guidance? As a business owner or employee, you help make a community strong. Take ownership of that responsibility and recognize the value of your leadership presence every day. Being a great leader means making the most of the leadership equation both as a giver and a receiver.

Cheers

Connie Hanner

365 Days of Leadership: No Diet Day

May 6 is No Diet Day….it’s not what you think. No Diet Day focuses on making people aware of the dangers of dieting.

No Diet Day aims to help to teach people to have a healthy relationship with food, and to ditch restrictive diets and the harmful results they often have, such as anorexia and body-type perceptions in the media.

Too much of a good thing can be bad. Too little of a good thing can be bad. Our relationship with food, family and friends is about balance. We hear a lot about “work/life balance”. Yea, it’s a crock, there is no such thing as “work/life balance”. There can be no balance when the first two hours of the morning is spent getting ready to go to work and the last 4 hours of the evening is spent trying to recover from work.

Typically, I don’t agree with the laissez-faire attitude of Millennials and Gen Nexters, however I must admit that our current working paradigm is not conducive to a healthy lifestyle. Tyrannical bosses, being made to feel bad if you DON’T work 80 hour weeks, putting your personal safety on the line because your boss is afraid of missing a quarterly goal; these unreasonable demands are destructive to a person’s physical and mental health. It can jeopardize a person’s relationships and their life.

Perhaps the Millennials and Gen Nexters have the right idea; they are shifting the paradigm to focus on a true work/life balance and not an unbalanced life which revolves around work.

Cheers

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Connie Hanner is a PhD student in non-profit organizational leadership and a veteran of both non-profit and for-profit organizations. Visit her website at http://www.conniehanner.com. Find her on Face Book, Linked In and follow her on Twitter.

365 Days of Leadership: International Guide Dog Day

April 29th is International Guide Dog Day, the day we celebrate the love, patience and service that guide dogs provide to millions of persons all over the world. One of my favorite Guide Dog organization is Leader Dogs for the Blind. Working in association with Lions Clubs International and other agencies, Leader Dogs for the Blind invests an average of $35,000 into the training of service animal who is paired with a visually impaired person. This animal is paired with the visually impaired person at no charge.

Locally, Norma Campbell works at the state representative for Leader Dogs for the Blind. Read Norma’s full story at Western Kentucky Life Magazine.

Be thankful for the work of people like those at Leader Dogs for their dedication to helping others. If you want information about donating to the organization or becoming a puppy raiser, visit the organization’s Facebook page.

Cheers

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Connie Hanner is a PhD student in non-profit organizational leadership and a veteran of both non-profit and for-profit organizations. Visit her leadership website at http://www.conniehanner.com. Find her on Face Book, Linked In and follow her on Twitter.

365 Days of Leadership: Cubicle Day

April 28 is Cubicle Day. Whether you actually work in an office with a cubical system or the cubicle is the metaphor one uses to describe their life, it is the representation of uniformity and standardization that Americans simply cannot stand . Now, don’t get me wrong, I like knowing what I can and can’t do. Uniformity and standardization are good things. Without organization, our world would be chaos, but the cubicle suggests that your life begins and ends within this sterile little space which defines what you do, not who you are.

My cubicle is always barren. It is that way on purpose, because my public work does not define me. It is part of my life, but not my entire life. The beauty of life exists outside the walls of my confinement and I love breathing in the air of freedom that 5:00 p.m. brings. Work is a necessary evil, because money is a necessary evil. To be truly happy, one should find what they love to do, then figure out a way to make money doing it. (As long as its legal!)

So, get up, get dressed and go do what you have to do, but remember that your job is not who you are.  The cubicle suggests that we can’t (or shouldn’t) aspire to anything more…and that’s a load of crap.

Cheers!

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Connie Hanner is a PhD student in non-profit organizational leadership and a veteran of both non-profit and for-profit organizations. Visit her leadership website at http://www.conniehanner.com. Find her on Face Book, Linked In and follow her on Twitter.